Monthly Archives: March 2015

Microsoft System Center Reporting Cookbook available soon

A new System Center book is on the horizon which covers the very important reporting topic. It will be published Friday 27th. You can find the link to the book and more information about it on the blog of Steve Buchanan, MVP and technical reviewer of the book.

Why is this book special?

Reporting is essential in the System Center world. What is for example Sccm without patch compliance reports? But where can you find good information about how to design System Center reports besides searching the web? This book gives you guidance with easy to follow recipes and a lot of useful information about setup, report design and other options besides SSRS like PowerPivot.

A big thank from me goes to Sam Erskine, one of the authors, who had the idea for the book. He managed the publication from the beginning to the end and it is really his baby. He made it possible that I was a technical reviewer of this book, that I saw how it grew and I am proud as a nurse which helped to bring a baby to live, that I had a small part in it.

So buy it, read it and share it ;-).

SCCM 2012: Install downloaded Software Update through PowerShell

With the last Patch cycle from Microsoft we had a bigger problem with the patch MS15-018, which failed on a lot of servers. The patch also prevented all other following patches to be installed. It was downloaded correctly, but could only be installed manually by running the downloaded exe-file from the SCCM cache folder.

To automate this a bit, my colleague Mihaly Kolozsi created a PowerShell script based on my design ideas. A big thank to him for borrowing me his brain and time ;-).

You can download it here.

SCOM 2012: SC Orchestrator Additions Management Pack

There are already some management packs available, to monitor System Center Orchestrator 2012 with System Center Operations Manager 2012:

I am missing in those for example the monitoring of the Orchestrator database. After I wrote my last post about the Policy_Publish_Queue filling up in Orchestrator, I decided to create a mangement pack to monitor that and also added some tasks I thought that they could be useful.

You can find the management pack here

I would be glad about any comment or improvement idea.

 

SCOM 2012: Check greyed out agents

Greyed out agents are can be a nightmare for a System Center Operations Manager admin. An agent gets greyed out if the Health Service is not communicating correctly with the Management Servers. Normally an alert should be created with the name “Health Service Heartbeat Failure” which indicates this status. But sometimes I see the situation that the alert was created, but also auto-resolved by the system after a while (because of an agent recovery etc.). The problem then is if the agent still stays in an unhealthy state but no new alert gets created. I see that from time to time if the agent is stuck or has resource problems. This situation needs to be solved quickly because during that time no monitoring on the agent side takes place.

So how can this be resolved?

I implemented this solution: The management servers already know which agents are greyed out, so I have created a rule which runs on the “All Management Servers Resource Pool” every 5 min (you can select another interval if you like). It checks which agents are greyed out but are not in maintenance mode and then checks for each agent if there is an open “Health Service Heartbeat Failure” alert. It adds the server to a list which will be populated in one alert with the name “Sample – greyed out agents”, if no alert was found.

The main logic of the rule bases on a Powershell script. Here is the part, with the logic – I have skipped everything around it (log function, SCOM module, etc.).

$TotalCount=0
$list=””
$agentclass = Get-SCOMClass -Name “Microsoft.SystemCenter.Agent”
# Find greyed out agents which are not in maintenance mode
$agentobjects = Get-SCOMMonitoringObject -Class:$agentclass | Where-Object {($_.IsAvailable -eq $false) -and ($_.InMaintenanceMode -eq $False)}
if ($agentobjects -is [Object])
{
    $msg = “`r`nFound greyed out agents which are not in maintenance mode.”;
    Log -msg $msg -debug $debug -debugLog $debugLog;
    # Go through agent list
    foreach ($agent in $agentobjects) 
   {
       $msg =  “`r`n”+ $agent.displayname
       Log -msg $msg -debug $debug -debugLog $debugLog;
       #Go on if watcher state for the agent is unhealthy
       if((Get-SCOMClass -name “Microsoft.SystemCenter.HealthServiceWatcher”| get-scomclassinstance |  Where-Object {$_.Displayname   -eq $agent.DisplayName}).HealthState -ne ‘Success’)
       {
           # Find open Health Service Heartbeat Failure alert for the agent
           $alert=get-scomalert -name ‘Health Service Heartbeat Failure’ | where {($_.ResolutionState -ne 255) -and ($_.MonitoringObjectDisplayName -eq $agent.DisplayName)}
           # No alert for greyed out agent found
           if ($alert -isnot [Object])
           {
               $list+=”`r`n”+$agent.displayname
               $msg=”`r`nThe agent “+ $agent.displayname + ” has no open Health Service Heartbeat Failure alerts. Add to list.”
               Log -msg $msg -debug $debug -debugLog $debugLog;
               $Totalcount++
           }
       }
   } 
}

You can find the rule in a small management pack called Sample.BaseMonitoring, which you can download here.
It is designed for SCOM 2012 SP1. Please test it in your development environment before you add it to production!